fbpx
was successfully added to your cart.

Cart

Monthly Archives

November 2022

Why you aren’t getting long term results

By | Health, Metabolic Balance, Mindset

I knew about 10 minutes in that I was in trouble.

10km wasn’t far, I had done 5, 6, 7km often. The difference was in the pack I was carrying. It wasn’t until we were loading up at the car that I realised the all important strap that causes your hips to take most of the weight was broken. Add to that our heavy & impractical blow up mattress (many of you will have heard all about THAT saga) and the fact that we had to carry enough water for all four of us for 24 hours in warm QLD conditions while we sweated our way from one end of the Carnarvon Gorge to the other, and I was in struggle town. From behind I looked like a hiking pack with legs, I know this because unbeknownst to me, Theo took a rather unflattering photo of me from behind while I tried in vain to secure the hip strap.

After about 45 minutes I moved ahead of Nick and the boys so I could give myself a little pep talk.
Tessa, this is going to be much harder than you thought, but you can’t give up, the boys are watching, and you want to do more of these hikes in the future, you’ve got to push on.

My knees already felt like they wanted to drop out of my body and slink way to die in the bushes and I was only about a fifth of the way.

In my mind I was chanting encouraging words and recalculating how much further we had to go at every signpost we passed. It wasn’t that unlike childbirth now I think about it.

Every few minutes we would pass hikers coming the other way and while it was nice to have eye contact with strangers (this does not happen in Frankston!) they all had something to say about our clearly under-equipped life choices.

‘Are you camping overnight?!’ They would often ask with a smug smile. These goody-two-shoes had obviously got up at the crack of dawn, hiked there and back and were heading back to the lodge where a glass of shiraz, cheese board and running water was waiting for them.

I passed one elderly couple resting on a bench with walking sticks and felt immensely better, if they could do it surely I could too. By this stage I was determined but so red and puffed out that all I could manage was a nod in their direction.

The leader of the next group of people stopped for a chat, they were impressed and curious about our family and couldn’t believe we were planning to camp at the other end. They asked a few questions, told us we were in for a treat and then wished us luck. I was elated, I had never actually met anyone who had done this hike and hearing about the wonders ahead that we would probably have to explore all to ourselves was spurring me on. This was going to be the experience I had planned for my family for months now. My pack felt lighter, my pace quickened, I could do this! The next 45 minutes was a breeze, I only stopped for a moment to let a family of kangaroos pass in front of me, a joey peeking out from his mothers pouch.

‘You’ve got a long way to go!’, called out a man as we passed, ‘At least another four hours.’
I heard the boys groan behind me. Instantly, my pack felt impossibly heavy, the enchantment of the forest, the gorge walls (which were glowing in the afternoon light) and the river song was broken. The pain in my knees came back 10 fold and a black wave of doubt filled my mind.

I can’t do this, I have weak ankles, I’ll injure myself, we’re too far from help if anything happens, we’ll run out of water, the boys are going to get bitten by a snake and die a painful, slow death, this is irresponsible.

It’s amazing the ways in which your mind can craft falsehoods in an effort to turn you away from discomfort. My thoughts and perceptions about my situation were shaping my physical reality, literally causing me pain.

For many people the war that rages on in their mind daily is with their relationship with food. They may win some small campaigns but ultimately, they always seem to end up defeated with no long term results. We all have a vision for ourselves and values about who we want to be and how we want to interact with food but somehow we never seem to gain victory long term.

The reason you aren’t winning the war is because you aren’t equipped. You need strategies, information about the inner workings of the terrain and a powerful battle cry – ok I’m taking the metaphor a little too far now I know. But you get my point right?

Food Freedom is the solution I created to educate while also challenge and equip you to win this battle, get the results and start living out the values you hold for your future self. It’s part Yoda, part Samwise Gamgee and part Fairy Godmother. It’s also the most cost effective way of working with me if 1:1 is beyond reach at the moment.

Topics I cover include goal setting for powerful habit mastery, emotional eating, hunger & cravings, self sabotage and how exactly your body works and wants to be fed so that is is nourished well and able to release any extra weight with ease. I also go over the basics like portions sizes, what foods should make up most of your daily eating and my helpful meal formula. There’s a lot of value!

If you join The Thrive Method you get access to Food Freedom as a gift (that’s one generous $397 gift) but you can also enrol for Food Freedom now and start today.

Is there a cure for Hashimoto’s?

By | Thyroid Health

I’ve encountered a lot of confusion and misinformation on whether there is a ‘cure’ for Hashimoto’s on the internet.

Rumours abound! Sheryl from Canberra says one thing, Monica’s GP told her this, Suzie’s myotherapist has another opinion and Kara’s next door neighbour sells this all natural pill which is practically a cure for everything so naturally she’s had the cure all along!

At the beginning of our journey if we weren’t lucky enough to have a Hashi’s savvy GP or specialist diagnose us, many of us heard something like this, “There is no cure, Hashimoto’s will eventually claim your thyroid and you’ll be reliant on lifelong hormone replacement therapy by that stage, here’s your prescription.”
Bloody bleak if you ask me! And on the other hand there are others, usually on social media, claiming they have found THE cure.

In my opinion, both are false.

It’s all a lot more nuanced and complicated than either of those scenarios will allow.

A cure implies that there is a single intervention such as a medication, therapy, pill, diet, supplement or lifestyle choice that can bring an end to the autoimmunity attack, normalise thyroid function and give you back your life permanently. If that is your definition then no, there is no single ‘cure’ for Hashimoto’s disease.

We need to remember that we are all unique and so is our Hashi’s story. Recovery can often be as complicated as what triggered the autoimmune disease in the first place which is a combination of at least 3 of the following; intestinal permeability (a ‘leaky’ gut that is on high alert due to poor function & inflammation), trauma/grief/stress, genetic predisposition, environmental exposures to heavy metals or other toxins, viral infections, nutrient deficiencies, being female, undergoing hormonal events such as child birth or menopause and other funky genetics that can impact our bodies ability to function optimally.

So how could one intervention (insert pill, therapy, device, diet, exercise) address all those factors? The honest answer is that it can’t and there really is no magic cure. Sorry!

BUT!

It’s not all doom & gloom either though because you don’t have to sit back and take the bad news lying down, you have plenty of control over how you feel and maybe even whether or not you can get yourself into remission too. You might not have the right tools or knowledge just yet, but they are out there. If you ever need to outsource this process I’m always here to help because having a clear plan, expert guidance and accountability from someone who understands your thyroid condition kinda makes me your Hashi’s fairy godmother.

Many have been able to get their antibodies down to below 100 (remission) or even 50 which means that you are technically no longer in a Hashimoto’s disease state. Generally speaking, the longer you’ve had Hashi’s the harder it is to bring antibodies down with lifestyle changes. That being said, you can still improve the symptoms drastically regardless of what your antibodies are doing and live a normal life that is no longer sabotaged by your symptoms. Last time I checked I was in remission (happy dance). While this can happen spontaneously in the case of postpartum Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, usually this occurs because these people have adopted dietary and lifestyle changes and found success.

As someone who falls into the former category and has built a career helping Hashi’s women regain their lives, my perspective is that Hashimoto’s is a chronic inflammatory condition and autoimmune disease that needs good management throughout your lifetime. Even if you do get antibodies into remission or lower, it has the potential to return if the triggers that were present initially are replicated or still present. We’ll always need to take better care of ourselves than your average person. Our liver, gut, thyroid and immune system just need more lovin’ and VIP treatment.

The important thing is to do what you can to improve your health and chances of remission while focusing on how you are feeling rather than the antibody numbers on the page. Because it is 1000% possible to maintain a healthy weight and have abundant energy with antibodies present.

So when it comes to Hashimoto’s, I prefer use the phrase ‘well managed’ rather than ‘cured’.